I Love Fine Wine – A Syrupy White Signed Southwestern France

I tried unassailable only just couldn’t find anything on the French winemaker Louis Blanc except that he shares his name alongside a well-known coach of the French Revolution of 1848. The Vin de Pays is an unpretentious appellation dating back to another French revolutionary year, 1968. The Vin de Pays des Cotes de Gascogne appellation itself dates back to 1982 and includes reds, rosés, and whites, many from relatively unknown grapes. Gascony is in southwest France, not far from the Spanish border. The Gros Manseng is allegedly less elegant than its smaller cousin, Petit Manseng. During my wine courses I tasted a few hundred wines, unrivaled one of which made me flinch up and down. It was a sweet white made from the Petit and Gros Manseng grapes, albeit from a part of France near the Swiss border. The wife wine is a higher-ranked sweet white from southern Italy at less than half the price.

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Wine Reviewed Domaine de Roustits Moelleux Gros Manseng (No Vintage) 12 % alcohol about $20.

There were no marketing materials so let’s start with my sight translation about the back label. “Sweet white wine, goes well with the most delicate dishes. Great with foie gras. Drink chilled. ” And now for my review.

At the aborigine sips this vinic was very long, smoky, and syrupy. The initial meal centered on an Atlantic salmon filet baked in cumin, fresh cilantro, garlic powder, and red pepper. This drink responded including a smoky, pleasant burnt taste and a estimable balance of sweetness and acidity. The side of quinoa increased its power. The hand of beets increased its smokiness. I found it dark for a white wine. Fresh pineapple for dessert shortened our Italian friend somewhat but it was very present and syrupy.

My next meal started with Japanese rice crackers. Now the wine was flowery and almost ethereal. The centerpiece, boxed Baked Ziti Siciliano doused with grated Parmesan cheese, rendered this liquid somewhat metallic, multilayered, and smoky. Its acidity was right on. When accompanying a tomato, beets, cilantro, red onion, broccoli sprouts, sliced carrots, et alii cabbage salad, this wine was slightly lighter but basically the same. It was very long. Dessert was fresh blueberries. In response the Gros Manseng offered a bit of caramel. Its acidity and sweetness were very balanced.

The final meal featured an omelet perked up with black pepper, tarragon, garlic powder, and ground cumin. Again this libation was truly long showing balance between its acidity and sweetness. It was syrupy and multilayered. Zesty guacamole didn’t change much in the glass. And now for something negative, a vanilla ice cream bar in a thick chocolate coating gutted this liquid. What a waste.

Final verdict. This is a real keeper. I have asked my local wine store to bring in a case. Not all for me. By the way, my wife who doesn’t usually fancy wine is also very positive about this one. It is almost as good as its cousin from a few years back.